design

Wedding | Garret + Renee

This private ranch Lewisburg, PA wedding is what all relaxed boho brides dream of!

As soon as Garrett + Renee described the inspiration of the wedding, Art Deco Bohemian, I was hooked! The ranch is the property of a friend of the couples. Nestled atop the rolling mountains it offered amazing sweeping views of the Appalachian mountains and the valley below. The venue offered a hill top tented reception space and a forested ceremony location. 

The couples day was not complete without some amazing help from family and friends. The mother of the bride did all of the bridal party florals. One of the bridesmaids designed the programs with an adorable map of the property, as well as did the Renees makeup. 

We made a floral crown for the bride and eucalyptus crowns for all of the flower girls. All of the vintage accessories were from a small shop in downtown Lewisburg were the Bride is a buyer. Her amazing silk kimono was from Etsy. 

For reception decor we used ferns submerged in water as simple and clean centerpieces.  Lots of vintage props from the same shop as the accessories decorated everything from the head table to the bar and dessert table.

We loved working on this wedding and the couple was a dream. Did we mention there were horses, goats and a tee pee! Come on!

Photography | Amanda Nichols photography 

Venue |  Private Ranch, Lewisburg, PA

Styling | Ruie + Grace

Floral Crowns| Ruie + Grace

spring-a-ding-ding

Spring is the time for rejuvenation. It’s that time of year when we dust off the snow, crawl out of hibernation to greet the warm breezes, longer days, and budding flowers. Since that stupid ground hog saw his shadow or something, that means Mother Nature might not be ready for spring, but we sure are--predictive rodents be damned!!!

To convey what we’re feeling on the inside even though it might be a month too early for it on the outside, we handpainted big colorful blooms on the Fleurir Old town Alexandria window. We went with less realistic, almost cartoonish flowers that felt a little more playful than your typical spring prints. This is our third handpainted window and every time we learn new tricks that make it easier and more dynamic.

To get the flowers just right we took a sketch of Emily’s and enlarged it using a projector. Our projector is the Tracer Jr. from Michaels, they aren’t cheap so make sure to use a 40% coupon that is almost always available on their app or in their weekly mailer.

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We drew the flowers on brown butcher paper and taped them up on the outside of the windows, painted the outline in a dark brown, and filled in  with our bright pinks and corals for the flowers, then sage and citron greens for the leaves. This time we experimented more by coming back in with a blade and scraping away portions to exaggerate the curved edges of the leaves.  We also used a wooden sculpting tool (softwood won’t scratch a window) to add in swirls and details in the flowers. For some of the flowers we painted in the negative part to add a pop color, but others we left translucent to help define the flowers more.

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The end result is a fresh floral window we’re hoping pushes that dumb ground hog back into his hole and lures an early spring out from behind this rather harsh winter!

Fleurir's Feathery Flock

This post is coming a bit late and on the coat tails of us being able to photograph it right before we took it down for Fleurir's Valentines Day window.  We loved the idea of a snow owl family, one for each member of the owners family for their Georgetown Christmas window.  One of the best things about using animals for display is their ability to create whimsical narratives in small spaces. We had way too much fun making this feathery flock!  We started by loosely balling up paper and taping it together to create the owl's main structure, then used masking tape to help define the owl form.  For the plumage we used  white watercolor paper that we tore by hand to get a rough feathery edge and a mix of inexpensive feathers purchased at our local craft store.  To add some detail to some of the top coat of torn watercolor feathers we used a wood burner especially.

We hope you enjoy!

Brit & Emily thebackdropshopblog.com

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