ombre

Ruffled Blog- Our Styled Shoot

photo 4-8

We are soooo completely thrilled to finally share with you all a secret we have been keeping for the past few months!  In November, we collaborated on a styled shoot with some very talented individuals and it was selected to feature on Ruffled Blog!! EEP!  (Happy dance!)  Ruffled is an amazing resource for newly engaged couples to seek inspiration for their weddings and we are so honored to be included on their blog.  Head on over and see our styled shoot to read more about our inspiration/view the pretty pictures.  We included a few snapshots below from the day for your viewing pleasures.  Enjoy!

Credits:

Venue || Battlefield Bed & Breakfast || http://www.gettysburgbattlefield.com

Photography|| Tom and Keidi || http://tomandkeidi.com/blog/

Hair & Makeup ||Nicole Castano || http://www.nicolecastano.com

Special thanks to our models Jenna and Tom for being so pretty!!

Lauren + Patrick's Wedding

A few weekends ago we had our first “official” job as The Backdrop Shop for the wedding of Lauren and Patrick, set in the charming town of Lewisburg, Pa. The bride, Lauren, is a good friend of my college bestie, Kellie. I approached her in the fall about designing her wedding and she graciously agreed to allow us to turn her vision into a reality. She already had some of the big decisions out of the way.  The venue, a farm called Colonial Pines in her hometown, was beautiful and perfect for her style that we referred to as “rustic chic”. decor by: thebackdropshopblog.com

Decor by: Thebackdropshopblog.com

Lauren is an interior designer here in D.C . She has a great sense of style and is easily the most decisive bride I’ve ever met. I started by pulling together a pinterest inspiration board for her and we went through it together deciding the right look for her and Patricks nuptials.

Decor: Thebackdropshopblog.com

Right of the bat she knew she wanted the ceremony outside and wanted a romantic nature inspired backdrop. The picture she loved was the BHLDN flower backdrop , so we got started right away cutting out hundreds of petals.

BHLDN

We dyed them using the bridesmaids dress colors as inspiration, pre-strung them and then installed on site.  We tied up three different levels of fishing line to string our flowers and tethered them to the ground to avoid a mid-ceremony breeze blows paper flowers in-yo-face moment.

Decor by: Thebackdropshopblog.com

Decor by: Thebackdropshopblog.com

Decor by: Thebackdropshopblog.com

Decor by: Thebackdropshopblog.com

Decor by: thebackdropshopblog.com

Lauren knew she wanted live music and had already booked a great wedding band, CTO 5th Avenue. The dance floor was in the center of the barn which had very high ceilings and limited lighting, so we made our own! Strings of café lights came to the center of the floor to a chandelier we made out of PVC piping, hand dyed  jersey torn into strips and lots and lots of hot glue. Poor Emily suffered one of the worst hot glue gun burns either of us had ever endured, which says a lot considering I don’t think I have finger prints left since we use and abuse glue guns so often, or should I say we use and they abuse.

Decor by: Thebackdropshopblog.com

Decor by: Thebackdropshopblog.com

Lighting is so important to setting the mood for a wedding reception and café lights, traditional Christmas lights/twinkle lights and candle light are some of the cheapest to ways to cast of romantic lighting in large spaces.

Decor by: Thebackdropshopblog.com

Decor by: Thebackdropshopblog.com

To break-up the large wall behind the head table we hung fabric banners that we ombre dyed. Check out our DIY ombre dye tutorial.

Decor by: Thebackdropshopblog.com

Lauren loved the look of long banquet tables and had already decided on burlap runners and white table cloths. She wanted minimal flowers arrangements, which really helped to emphasized all of the different candle holder and vases she had been collecting since her engagement. The tables were set with the guests favors, vintage salad plates collected from flea markets and antique shops.

Decor by: Thebackdropshopblog.com

Decor by: Thebackdropshopblog.com

The bride had also been building quite the collection of “found objects”, everything from frames to toy wagons. We ended using all of the found objects to decorate the guest and gift tables, bar and seating signs. It was great to have all of these pieces to make each wedding necessity feel like its own special moment.

Decor by: Thebackdropshopblog.com

Decor by: Thebackdropshopblog.com

Decor by: Thebackdropshopblog.com

Decor by: Thebackdropshopblog.com

Decor by: Thebackdropshopblog.com

Decor by: Thebackdropshopblog.com

Decor by: Thebackdropshopblog.com

Decor by: Thebackdropshopblog.com

Decor by: Thebackdropshopblog.com

Photographry: Tom + Keidi http://tomandkeidi.com/blog/ || Dress: Sabrina Ann www.sabrinaann.com || Venue: Colonial Pines, Lewisburg, PA

 

Decor by: Thebackdropshopblog.com

 

Ombre DIY

Ombre is a huge trend right now that can be seen everywhere from hair color to home décor .  When it comes to achieving this trend in your home or wedding decor all you need is dye, water, fabric and a bit of patience.

thebackdropshopblog.com

To get started you will need some fabric. For this project we used bleached muslin. It’s such a cheap and versatile fabric that takes dye very well, making it a DIYers dream! We trimmed ours down to manageable 40” wide by 8’ long pieces.  Our final project was a set of banners that were used to add some color to a drab barn wall behind the head table of Lauren's wedding. This size would also be great for a single panel curtain, but always consider your project before cutting your fabric. The old "measure twice cut once" adage defiantly applies here.

When cutting it down to your desired size just snip the unfinished edge, called the raw edge, and tear. It tears perfectly straight so no need for a big table top, hours of cutting and a headache. Yet another reason to love muslin!!

It's important to let your fabric soak in water for a bit, minimum 5-10 minutes, this helps the fabric take the dye more evenly. While it’s soaking, start filling your dye bath with enough hot water to completely submerge the fabric.

Now it’s time to start mixing your color. It helps to have a sample of the color you’re aiming for. We love perusing the paint samples at the hardware store selecting our favorite shades. Even if you’re not trying to match it exactly it helps to serve as a guide.

IMG_9208

All of the dye we used, Rit and iDye, can be purchased at your local Jo Ann's or Michaels. Be sure to load either stores apps to your smart phone, both offer tons of coupons that can be scanned right from your phone and can save you a ton on your craft store purchases!

Here is where your patience will be tested. You need to add the dye slowly, sprinkle by sprinkle.  We use both a mix of powdered dye and liquid dye. It's just the forms the dyes come in but there is no significant difference in the outcomes. If you’re like me you’ll want to dump a bunch of your dye in at once to really see a color change but going slowly will give you control and ensure you don’t go too dark. Think of adding dye to water like adding spices to your favorite meal, a little goes a long way.  But, if you happen to accidentally add too much, just pour out part of your dye bath, add more hot water, and start again.

Have small test strips (2 to 3” wide) of your fabric cut soaked and ready, dip them and compare to the paint chips. Don't get frustrated if you’re not familiar with mixing colors. Use your paint chip as your guide and remember, you’re not necessarily trying to match this color, but use it as inspiration. For ombre dyeing we picked 3 different chips, all similar in color but with different tones.  Once you find a color you love it's time to add the fabric.

IMG_9235

For small projects like pillows or a dress you will be able to do this on our own, but for bigger projects like ours it was helpful to have another pair of hands. Decide how much fabric you want to remain white and slowly lower the rest into the dye bath.  To avoid Easter-egg hands be sure to wear rubber gloves when dyeing, you have been warned!

diagram

Slowly raise the fabric out of the water just a bit and pause again, allowing for more saturation to the fabric that is still left in the bath.

IMG_9212

Continue to lift and soak remaining until you hit the end of your piece, then hang on a line to dry! For a more intense ombre you will need to let it dry and repeat a few times letting it soak longer on the very bottom. For our decorative panels we repeated this process three times. It helps to let it air dry almost fully in between each dipping so you can really tell what end result will be since it will usually dry quite a bit lighter. You can also add more dye to the same bath in between dyeing to really punch up the ombre or change the color all together to get a multi colored ombre.

thebackdropshopblog.com

To make the decorative panels we simply hemmed all four sides and tacked them up to the barn wall- a great, inexpensive way to add a pop of color to large spaces!

 thebackdropshopblog.com

ombre-materials-list

 

Have questions?  Email us: writethebackdropshop@gmail.com